Whittaker Mountaineering
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Wet Ones

One wipe cleans dirt and messes and kills 99% of germs!

  • 15 count travel pack
  • Perfect for quick cleanups of dirt and messes without drying skin
  • Kills 99.99% of germs
  • Wet Ones® are an effective solution to keeping hands clean when soap and water are not available
  • Hypoallergenic and enriched with skin-conditioning aloe
  • Available in 2 great scents - Fresh Scent and Citrus
  • Portable and convenient
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One wipe cleans dirt and messes and kills 99% of germs! 15 count travel pack Perfect for quick cleanups of dirt and messes without drying skin Kills 99.99% of germs Wet Ones® are an effective solution to keeping hands clean when soap and water…

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Mountain Logic™

Tips for Layering in the Mountains

Mountain climbing demands a lot from your body.  One of the biggest challenges in cold environments is regulating your body temperature, which is critical for optimum performance. The best way to stabilize your temperature is through layering.  Layering allows you to:
    a. Manage body temperature efficiently
    b. Minimize sweat
    c. Insulate from the cold
    d. Protect from wind, rain, snow

Shed a Layer - If you are comfortable when standing still, you will overheat quickly once you start climbing.

Keep Cool - If possible, avoid sweating.  Once your layers get wet it is difficult to dry them out during a day of activity.

Regulate Your Temperature - Climbing efficiently is directly related to how hot or cold your body is running. Taking the time to shed or add a layer will improve your climb.

Layer Up at Rest Breaks - Quickly throw on a jacket or your parka at a break to trap the heat you generated climbing.

For more tips on Layering check out our Mountain LogicTM: Guide to Layering
For help ing selecting the right insulation piece for your adventure read our Mountain LogicTM: Guide to Insulation


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Mountain Logic™

Choosing The Right Sleeping Bag

Having the wrong sleeping bag leads to not much sleep at all. When choosing a bag, match the temperature rating of the bag to anticipated temperatures of the location you’ll be in. Keep in mind, not all rating systems are the same between manufacturers.

Consider the following when choosing a bag:

1. What are the lowest anticipated temperatures?
2. Sleeping surface?  Snow? Rock? Scree?
3. What is your sleeping style - Do you sleep cold or hot?
4. Wet climate or dry?

Peter Whittaker: Mountain Guide"Prepare for the worst, hope for the best. That’s my philosophy. I always go with a bag that’s 5-10 degrees colder than the anticipated low temperatures. For me, the extra ounces are worth it for a little more warmth and a good night’s sleep. " Peter Whittaker
 

 

 

"I sleep cold in the mountains, so I tend to bring a bag rated  colder than the forecasted low temp." - Solveig Waterfall

 

 

 

 


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Mountain Logic™

Guide to Sleeping Bags and Pads


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Mountain Logic™

Choosing The Right Sleeping Bag

Having the wrong sleeping bag leads to not much sleep at all. When choosing a bag, match the temperature rating of the bag to anticipated temperatures of the location you’ll be in. Keep in mind, not all rating systems are the same between manufacturers.

Consider the following when choosing a bag:

1. What are the lowest anticipated temperatures?
2. Sleeping surface?  Snow? Rock? Scree?
3. What is your sleeping style - Do you sleep cold or hot?
4. Wet climate or dry?

Peter Whittaker: Mountain Guide"Prepare for the worst, hope for the best. That’s my philosophy. I always go with a bag that’s 5-10 degrees colder than the anticipated low temperatures. For me, the extra ounces are worth it for a little more warmth and a good night’s sleep. " Peter Whittaker
 

 

 

"I sleep cold in the mountains, so I tend to bring a bag rated  colder than the forecasted low temp." - Solveig Waterfall

 

 

 

 


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Mountain Logic™

Guide to Sleeping Bags and Pads


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Mountain Logic™

Choosing The Right Sleeping Bag

Having the wrong sleeping bag leads to not much sleep at all. When choosing a bag, match the temperature rating of the bag to anticipated temperatures of the location you’ll be in. Keep in mind, not all rating systems are the same between manufacturers.

Consider the following when choosing a bag:

1. What are the lowest anticipated temperatures?
2. Sleeping surface?  Snow? Rock? Scree?
3. What is your sleeping style - Do you sleep cold or hot?
4. Wet climate or dry?

Peter Whittaker: Mountain Guide"Prepare for the worst, hope for the best. That’s my philosophy. I always go with a bag that’s 5-10 degrees colder than the anticipated low temperatures. For me, the extra ounces are worth it for a little more warmth and a good night’s sleep. " Peter Whittaker
 

 

 

"I sleep cold in the mountains, so I tend to bring a bag rated  colder than the forecasted low temp." - Solveig Waterfall

 

 

 

 


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Mountain Logic™

Guide to Sleeping Bags and Pads


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Mountain Logic™

Guide to Mountain Footwear


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Mountain Logic™

Mountaineering Boot Fit

How a boot fits is without question the most important factor of boot selection. While trekking boots and hiking shoes should fit the same as your street shoes, general and high alpine mountaineering boots are fit a little differently. A good fit correctly addresses the three dimensions of your foot.

Watch Mountaineering Boot Fit w/ Melissa Arnot and Peter Whittaker

Boot Fit Tips

Always Size Up - one-half to one full size. More room = more circulation = warm feet

Prevent Toe Bang - Half of mountain climbing is walking downhill. Make sure your toes do not touch the front of the boot. Test for this by lacing your boot up tightly and tapping your toe behind you. If your toes feel crunched against the end of the boot, size up.

Comparative Fit - They shouldn't fit like ski boots. Mountaineering boots are made for walking, so you should have a looser, roomy fit. Tight boots are a recipe for discomfort, decreased circulation and potential frostbite.

First Impressions - Have your sock system, lace up the boots and walk, stand sit, tap your toes and scuffle around for 15 minutes?

Brands and Models - If a boot fits too tight overall, you're likely in the wrong size. If the boot is pinching in some areas but is loose in other, your in the wrong brand or model. Boot brands used different lasts, even between different models.


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Mountain Logic™

Backpacks


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Mountain Logic™

Guide to Backpacks


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Mountain Logic™

Backpacks


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Mountain Logic™

Backpack Features

Less is more. Stay away from packs with too many bells and whistles. Evaluate features with these two questions in mind: 1) What is the feature’s main function? and  2) Will I use it?

 

"For a big expedition like Denali, I want a pack that is simple, lightweight and can handle the load. I stay away from packs that are overbuilt with pounds of zippers and extra straps. I just want something with a large main compartment and a solid suspension system." - Seth Waterfall

 

 

"Simplicity – I want a pack with no bells and whistles and no excecss straps." - JJ Justman

 

 


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Mountain Logic™

Guide to Backpacks


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Mountain Logic™

Choosing The Right Sleeping Bag

Having the wrong sleeping bag leads to not much sleep at all. When choosing a bag, match the temperature rating of the bag to anticipated temperatures of the location you’ll be in. Keep in mind, not all rating systems are the same between manufacturers.

Consider the following when choosing a bag:

1. What are the lowest anticipated temperatures?
2. Sleeping surface?  Snow? Rock? Scree?
3. What is your sleeping style - Do you sleep cold or hot?
4. Wet climate or dry?

Peter Whittaker: Mountain Guide"Prepare for the worst, hope for the best. That’s my philosophy. I always go with a bag that’s 5-10 degrees colder than the anticipated low temperatures. For me, the extra ounces are worth it for a little more warmth and a good night’s sleep. " Peter Whittaker
 

 

 

"I sleep cold in the mountains, so I tend to bring a bag rated  colder than the forecasted low temp." - Solveig Waterfall

 

 

 

 


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Mountain Logic™

Guide to Sleeping Bags and Pads


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Mountain Logic™

Choosing The Right Sleeping Bag

Having the wrong sleeping bag leads to not much sleep at all. When choosing a bag, match the temperature rating of the bag to anticipated temperatures of the location you’ll be in. Keep in mind, not all rating systems are the same between manufacturers.

Consider the following when choosing a bag:

1. What are the lowest anticipated temperatures?
2. Sleeping surface?  Snow? Rock? Scree?
3. What is your sleeping style - Do you sleep cold or hot?
4. Wet climate or dry?

Peter Whittaker: Mountain Guide"Prepare for the worst, hope for the best. That’s my philosophy. I always go with a bag that’s 5-10 degrees colder than the anticipated low temperatures. For me, the extra ounces are worth it for a little more warmth and a good night’s sleep. " Peter Whittaker
 

 

 

"I sleep cold in the mountains, so I tend to bring a bag rated  colder than the forecasted low temp." - Solveig Waterfall

 

 

 

 


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Mountain Logic™

Guide to Sleeping Bags and Pads


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Read More Mountain Logic™

Mountain Logic™

Choosing The Right Sleeping Bag

Having the wrong sleeping bag leads to not much sleep at all. When choosing a bag, match the temperature rating of the bag to anticipated temperatures of the location you’ll be in. Keep in mind, not all rating systems are the same between manufacturers.

Consider the following when choosing a bag:

1. What are the lowest anticipated temperatures?
2. Sleeping surface?  Snow? Rock? Scree?
3. What is your sleeping style - Do you sleep cold or hot?
4. Wet climate or dry?

Peter Whittaker: Mountain Guide"Prepare for the worst, hope for the best. That’s my philosophy. I always go with a bag that’s 5-10 degrees colder than the anticipated low temperatures. For me, the extra ounces are worth it for a little more warmth and a good night’s sleep. " Peter Whittaker
 

 

 

"I sleep cold in the mountains, so I tend to bring a bag rated  colder than the forecasted low temp." - Solveig Waterfall

 

 

 

 


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Read More Mountain Logic™

Mountain Logic™

Guide to Sleeping Bags and Pads


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Read More Mountain Logic™